You can draw circuits! But does it make sense? Conductive Ink Pen Experiment!

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In this video I will be having a closer look at conductive ink pens and find out whether they are useful when it comes to creating electronics circuits. I will test 2 different types by doing an experiment targeting the resistance, current capability and frequency response. At the end we will know for certain in which way such conductive ink pens can be used.

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Music:
2011 Lookalike by Bartlebeats

0:00 Conductive Ink Pens?
1:39 Intro
2:25 Initial test
3:38 Focus on the silver pen
4:30 Resistance test
5:42 Max Current test
6:54 Frequency test
8:42 Verdict

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29 thoughts on “You can draw circuits! But does it make sense? Conductive Ink Pen Experiment!

  • June 6, 2021 at 3:28 pm
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    What keeps the silver liquid in the pen,what is the composition of silver alloy,may I ask?

    Reply
  • June 6, 2021 at 3:28 pm
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    bet you could make multi layer pcb's with it if you dedicate to it.
    aka laser cutter and or plotter to make stenciles ink the lines solder mask next layer etc etc.
    And or like a screen print….
    i onces tried to etch glass then addes solder past into the etches and then lasered them.
    And yes it kinda worked
    O.o
    ill check that out once i moved….would be awesome if you could layer them up.

    Reply
  • June 6, 2021 at 3:28 pm
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    We're suffered from Chinese Viruse.
    Hey Scott! Tell us alternative way than Jclcb.
    I don't like Chinese.

    Reply
  • June 6, 2021 at 3:28 pm
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    I had used a conductive pen to jump pins on an old AMD Athalon 64 professors. Made it run faster speed. Worked well.

    Reply
  • June 6, 2021 at 3:28 pm
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    It is sad that you advertise EasyEDA which, however, is not suitable for the creation of a "professional pcb". This is a tool for children because beginners should not be recommended, Unfortunately I listened to it. Now I know that, for example, Kicad is much better

    Reply
  • June 6, 2021 at 3:28 pm
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    If we use any kind printer for this ink type is may best way go go get direct pcb from print like paper print.

    Reply
  • June 6, 2021 at 3:28 pm
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    You could always use tape over a trace if you needed to cross another trace or to make a second layer clever stuff really

    Reply
  • June 6, 2021 at 3:28 pm
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    Pretty cool but i think you could of used a better stencil 😛

    Reply
  • June 6, 2021 at 3:28 pm
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    Hmm… what about a stencil? Using this ink like a solder paste ; also use a non-soaking-surface so paper wouldn't be great at having a stencil with this thing applied on it.

    Reply
  • June 6, 2021 at 3:28 pm
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    I've used a pencil to draw circuits. The graphite is conductive. On the original run of Athlon CPUs you could enable overclocking by drawing a line with a pencil on the top of the chip to connect two contacts. I've used a pencil to draw to connect a broken trace on circuit boards.

    Reply
  • June 6, 2021 at 3:28 pm
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    teacher: pass your prototype papers, And make sure its working at least… also get ready to explain it later

    Plot twist: the teacher is GreatScott

    Reply
  • June 6, 2021 at 3:28 pm
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    why not just use wires- you always have to keep a piece of paper if you want to make a circuit

    Reply

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