How to do Electrical Wiring properly! (more or less….) GERMAN STYLE!



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In this video me and my friend will show you how to do electrical wiring properly. That means we will remove the complete electrical system of his garage and install a new one. We will be talking about/showing you how to mount and wire up a new distribution box, install circuit breakers, mount electrical components like outlets, switches and lamps, install conduits, lay cable and finally how to connect all the components to one another. Let’s get started!

Websites which were shown in the video:
https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liste_der_Schaltzeichen_(Elektrik/Elektronik)

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Music:
2011 Lookalike by Bartlebeats
Killing Time, Kevin MacLeod
(incompetech.com)

0:00 Introduction
1:16 Intro
1:47 Drawing an Installation plan
2:42 Explaining the Flow sheet
4:20 Ordering the components
5:12 Practical Build
11:01 Final Test & End

source

55 thoughts on “How to do Electrical Wiring properly! (more or less….) GERMAN STYLE!

  • March 11, 2021 at 3:22 am
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    You should show us how to hack a doorbell. Turn a dumb doorbell into a smart one. Love your videos man.

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  • March 11, 2021 at 3:22 am
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    german here, not sure why i watched this, but i love the writing and the plan – so neat! ive seen some… bad ones lol. installation was also neat aswell!

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  • March 11, 2021 at 3:22 am
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    This is how I understand the disclaimer (spoiling the German habit of getting mental paralysed when meeting a certified expert):
    Use an expert unless you fully know what you are doing / unless you are competent enough.
    There‘s nothing wrong with doing it yourself as long as you know what you are doing, not just with electrics.

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  • March 11, 2021 at 3:22 am
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    What’s the point of the 5cm gap between the conduit and backboxes? In the UK the idea of cable containment is to contain the cable at all times, so bends, conduit boxes and glands would go where you have bare cable exiting the conduit before it reaches an accessory or turns a corner.

    I’m baffled!

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  • March 11, 2021 at 3:22 am
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    Down under in Australia we don't have the 5cm of exposed wire, we have conduit all the way to the junction box and we use blue points for splices.

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  • March 11, 2021 at 3:22 am
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    I actually went through all this research process just to make a solar generator ( single solar panel with a 1kw inverter ). Its very different to when you just do high power DC wiring where you can just solder 2 wires together and then cover it in heat shrink.

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  • March 11, 2021 at 3:22 am
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    This wiring is soooo german !!!!!! you should see how we do in mexico hahahahaha………….full hand wired , is not bad but you never know which wire is what !!! but never fails !!!! nice video i really like all that stuff, beautifull components and white ligthing of course hahaahha

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  • March 11, 2021 at 3:22 am
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    Looks like regulations are a bit more strict here in Belgium.
    – Even if you use a circuit breaker lower than 20A all socket cabling must be at least 2,5mm2.
    – When mixing sockets with lights the lights must also be connected with 2,5mm2.
    – Conduit ends require an end cap to prevent the "sharp" conduit edge cutting into the outer sheath of the cables.
    Very nice that you mentioned the use of different types wago splice connectors when using stranded cables.
    On top of that I use ferules on the stranded cables and they perfectly fit in those wago 221 splice connectors if you use the right ferrule (looks like they took that into account when designing those)

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  • March 11, 2021 at 3:22 am
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    A couple of things:

    1. Separate lines for tools and lights and use additional isolation around wires connected in WAGOs. Also it's good those to be separated in the small splitting boxes
    2. RCBO detects current difference between L and N, and PE is your (at least) protection when N is cut off. Also RCBO should be with different rating for different lanes – main 100mA, 30mA for tools/lights, 30 or 15mA for electronics (depends)
    3. Always, always use lightning protection (cathode arresters) on ALL 3 lines
    4. It's a good idea to have voltage protection on the input – it protects with cutting it off from the network when it becomes too high or too low (for example below 200V and higher than 235V)

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  • March 11, 2021 at 3:22 am
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    There is one little thing you could have done better, which would be to earth the DIN rail. I like the Pheonix Connect "USLKG" line because they are cheap on eBay, but it's important because wires often short out on the DIN rails themselves due to cuts in the wire jacket, loose connections, etc. You used a high quality wire jacket cutter so it is unlikely your tool went too deep with a razor blade and left a little nick in the jacket of the wire insulation, but in other parts of the world they use hand tools which aren't so precise and shorting out on the rail can be a real problem.

    When I moved into my house in Germany, there was a 3-phase 32A wire used to power a car lift / hebebühne (that the previous tenant stole) that was cut 2mm before the end of the METAL elctrical conduit it was sitting in. They had hacked it off with a saw to take the hebebühne, left the wire live. I only noticed it because snow came in under the garage door, then back up, and onto the end of the wire and made a huge bang. Didn't trip any of the breakers though. That wasn't the last time that crazy lady almost killed me after she moved out, but the purpose of my story is to say even when you do everything by the book, unexpected things happen. Even in Germany! 😀

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  • March 11, 2021 at 3:22 am
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    the light circuit and socket circuit are supposed to be on a separate breaker right ? in this video they where on the same breaker.

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  • March 11, 2021 at 3:22 am
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    in Belgium we place end caps on both ends of the conduits, called eindtullen, don't know the english word for it but if you google it you'll know what i mean. makes the conduits look a liitle cleaner and prevents possible wire damage from rubbing along the sharp opening edge.

    Reply
  • March 11, 2021 at 3:22 am
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    Hmm so a PVC pipe not directly connect to junction boxes?
    I have seen a lot of boxes that seem to have been made for that ( i mean directly connect).
    Does anyone know the reason why this is the case?

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  • March 11, 2021 at 3:22 am
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    Special tools? Essential eh? I'm happy using a carpenters knife and a pair of pliers for such a small installation.

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  • March 11, 2021 at 3:22 am
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    Why he pronounces words in this tone/prosody? I tried to search if there's a name or common pattern, but couldn't find anything. I've seen other YouTubers with the same cadence.

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  • March 11, 2021 at 3:22 am
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    European wiring is SO different than north american lol, in canada if you can conduit it has to go directly into the junction box with a coupling, not stop 5cm short and have exposed wiring.

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  • March 11, 2021 at 3:22 am
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    you guys use those stupid connectors for splicing in germany? those come on some lights here in canada, I CUT them off and splice it with a marette LOL

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  • March 11, 2021 at 3:22 am
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    Similar how we do things in Sweden, but it tend to vary between the electrician doing the work.
    What types of material he's most comfortable to use and what the customer is willing to pay.
    Been an electrician for more then 10 years here and seen very good installations as bad.
    I'm sure this guy is a professional, you can see it in the way he does the junction box. Guess its just a different mindset, regarding material and tool usage.

    But I can clearly see some things that most electricians here would have done differently! Both in material use, and how the installation is done.

    Since your putting up a new central. Why not put a main breaker and a new main fuse in, you had the space for it? Then going to whatever you wanted. Instead of using the old one, makes no sense to me.

    Not sure why you connected the led lights on both sides either and going between them, could have been avoided by either another junction box or using cables with 4-5 wires inside.
    Why he choose to enter the junction box on the lower inlets makes no sense to me either. Blocking top entrance, and have an unnecessary bend on the cables.

    My preferred method here would be using cable channels, think they blend better into the walls/corners bit more time consuming, but still quite fast if you're good at it. I'm almost positive I would have done it faster or in the same time he did using these pipes and a saw cutting them.
    One larger going from central along side the whole wall, with smaller ones going out to each LED light would been enough.

    Second option would be using pipes, similar to done in the video. But definitely smaller size! looks like 25mm to me, way bigger then what ever will be needed.
    I would also have connected them straight into the junction boxes. This gives you all the benefits of using pipes, being able to use wires without extra insulation. Making it easier to change out in the future, also cheaper since loose wires are cheaper and faster to use.

    My least favorite, but the preferred by many. Would be just putting the cable on the wall/ceiling using clips. If done correctly it looks almost if not better then using cable channels.

    I'm surprised to see the electrician not using lasers when mounting the piping! Makes it much easier to line things up and getting everything straight, and he wouldn't need to mark before hand.
    Also the big markings he makes for drilling positions and measure markings are still visible, something I would scold an apprentice by!
    And that he was using a saw to cut the pipes, here we all use a hand pruner for cutting up to 25-32mm pipes.
    Faster and you get a nicer edge on the cut my favorite brand and style https://www.amazon.com/Felco-F-2-Classic-Manual-Pruner/dp/B00023RYS6

    Of course all of this is probably only things an electrician would notice or ever think about…
    I'm sure most customers are satisfied with this result, and are just happy to have better lightning!

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  • March 11, 2021 at 3:22 am
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    in Australia 'proper' means you have to run the conduit all the way into junction boxes. looks nicer too

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  • March 11, 2021 at 3:22 am
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    ALARM. Jetzt hau ich mal einen raus. Was für eine Wand ist das und ist dein Hager IP20 Verteiler überhaupt im Bezug auf Brandschutz zugelassen auf dieser montiert zu werden?

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  • March 11, 2021 at 3:22 am
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    Australia's standards are a bit different here you can't put the lights and power points on the same circuit and the power points cant be run off 1.5 has to be 2.5mm2

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  • March 11, 2021 at 3:22 am
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    I once hired an electrician to fix a burnt fuse box.
    He cut the burnt part and simply spliced two wires by wrapping them around a nail… It hold for about 3 days until it burn down again.

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  • March 11, 2021 at 3:22 am
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    Why didn't he label any cable? I mean in a garage it's not a big problem, but in this video he clearly tried to do his best and missed the biggest troublemaker.

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  • March 11, 2021 at 3:22 am
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    It's surprising to me how the conduits don't finish at the junction box and the wiring is done with that jacketed wires, we doit here with single wires, and the conduits are finished inside the junction and equipment boxes so no wires are exposed.

    Great job, very clean and easy to fix if something need's a repair or change.

    Reply
  • March 11, 2021 at 3:22 am
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    I need to correct you, because i know that 1,5mm2 is rated for about 10Amps. (Basic rule 6A for every 1mm2 ) means for 1,5mm2 it will be 9A (10Amp), 2,5mm2 wire is rated for 16Amps.

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  • March 11, 2021 at 3:22 am
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    GERMAN STYLE… it was likely meant like the german style up to '90s 🙁

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  • March 11, 2021 at 3:22 am
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    We finally got to see your face! I expected a different look based on your voice 🙂 Nice video tho, I like how you used those screwless cable clamps – makes everything very easy to work with

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  • March 11, 2021 at 3:22 am
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    8:45 40cm horizontal (and diagonally).50cm vertically
    In the junction boxes: first PE than N than switch wire's (black/gray) and L last.

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  • March 11, 2021 at 3:22 am
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    Ich hätte min. einen 3 Reihigen Verteiler gesetzt, ebenso je nach Länge eine 10mm² oder 16mm² Zuleitung vom Hauptverteiler, dann ist man auf alle Fälle für die Zukunft gerüstet. Aber wenns nur bei dem Licht und den paar Steckdosen bleibt dann ist das ganze soweit in Ordnung. Kompressor, Schweißgerät oder Lademöglichkeit fürs E-Auto kann man so natürlich vergessen.

    Den FI mit dem Duspol zu testen ist auch ein wenig mager, eig. hätte da ein Installationstester ran müssen welcher Auslösezeit, Auslösestrom, Isolationswiderstand und Schleifenwiderstand misst. Aber wird leider sehr häufig nicht gemacht.

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  • March 11, 2021 at 3:22 am
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    Great Scott, I love your electronic vids. I didn't think a simple elecrical wiring in Germany was so complex! In North America the simple electrical drawings are easier to follow and installation are much simpler. Thanks for the videos.

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  • March 11, 2021 at 3:22 am
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    I'd like to mention, in Germany it takes 3,5 Years of Training to become an "official" professional electrical worker.
    During this training or "Ausbilding" you get about 300€ to 700€ per month.
    At the end you will have theoretical and practical exams and when you succeed you get your "Facharbeiterbrief", a smal
    notarised document saying you are a professional electrician.

    This goes for most jobs which have a government controlled training.
    Although pay ranges from 240€ up to 1,200€ as far as I know. I may have missed the point at which minimum wages for trainees have been introduced.

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  • June 19, 2021 at 8:57 am
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    Having read this I thought it was very informative. I appreciate you finding the time and effort to put this content together. I once again find myself personally spending a lot of time both reading and leaving comments. But so what, it was still worth it!

    Reply

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